Studio Focus: Dubspeeka / Hugh on July 16th

Dubspeeka

For our readers who are not familiar with you yet, can you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?

I’m a producer from Bristol. I’m currently releasing with Last Night On Earth, Drumcode and Skeleton. I used to write and perform the music for Kosheen.

What is your current studio set up?

Inside the Mac Pro I’m working with Ableton Live, Logic ProX, UAD plugs + Apollo Interface, NI, Circle2. Hardware consists of Adam A8 speakers, Moog Voyager, Juno6, Mackie Desk and some old guitar pedals.

When working on a track, what is your process?

It depends, sometimes I have an idea for a melody, so I’ll expand that and then maybe work on the drums later. Or I might have a strong groove in mind, so the drums are first with everything fitting afterwards. I tend not to use the same methods as I like to keep things interesting and fun. I also like to jam on the hardware, record everything and then edit the bits I like in Ableton. I’ve been doing this a lot lately, you get a nice natural flow in the arrangements this way.

How do you normally go about sourcing and designing sounds for your music?

I’ll have something in mind, and then I just tweak until there’s something I like. Most of the time it’s close, it can change, but I know when i hear it.

If you experience a creative block in the studio, do you have any particular rituals that get the inspiration flowing again?

Don’t force it. Take a break, go for a walk, listen to some music, get out of the studio space. Come back with a fresh head.

Mixing down can often be frustrating when starting out in production, what advice would you give for getting tracks ready for the club?

The best thing to do is AB your track to something you like. That’s a good starting point. If your bass is massively high in the mix compared to a lot of stuff your hearing out, you might want to take it down a few db, unless you want excessive sub. But it’s a good way to hear what other producers are doing in their mixes.

What’s up next for you, any releases in the pipeline?

I have a release coming out on Skeleton, it will include some ambient pieces which I’m quite excited about. Also have something coming out on Drumcode Ltd (vinyl only) which includes a Markus Suckut remix.


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Circle² Future Sounds: Chicago House / Hugh on June 27th

* All non percussive elements in this track are generated using Circle² Future Sounds: Chicago House.

Chicago is widely accepted as the birthplace of house music, and clubs / radio all over the world continue to breathe the signature sounds of 1980s Chicago to this day. Originally, analog synthesisers and hardware drum machines were the tools of the trade, but luckily today we can achieve similar results using software.

We have developed a bank of sounds inspired by this time in house music’s evolution. Alongside the presets we have also included a demo track, with the associated project file, audio stems and midi files we used in its creation, so you can pick apart the elements in order to understand the production techniques and be inspired! 

Download the pack below, it contains all the elements you need to make a grooving Chicago house style banger. We recommend tape saturating your master slightly and using these presets alongside swung Roland TR909 drum samples to get that real old school Chicago sound.

Circle² Future Sounds: Chicago House

1. Chi Bass
2. Deepchord
3. Rhodes Like
4. Strung
5. Vibes Chord

Download the expansion

Download the project files

To install the presets, just unzip and paste the folder “Future Sounds - Chicago House″ in here:

OSX - Application Support > FAW > Circle-2 > Presets
Windows - Program Files > FAW > Circle2 > Presets

Just how to Produce an Exploratory Essay with Trial Reports / Superuser on June 21st

Edit Report How to Make a Sock Doll You might never know what happened to that particular missing sock, nevertheless now you understand what related to its spouse. Several "orphan" stockings out of your washing place could be made into a doll that was huggable. Ad Methods Select three stockings to create your doll. They could be any measurement, but remember that any design or logo in it may also be so solid-colored, to the toy, gently worn stockings are greatest for this task. Continue Reading

Studio Focus: Richard Devine / Hugh on June 18th

Devine

For our readers who are not familiar with you yet, can you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?

I am a electronic artist and sound designer based in Atlanta Ga. I have been releasing music for the past 20 years under my own name, and in 2001 started working also as a sound designer which I am doing full time now today.  Which focuses on Musical composition, sonic mnemonics, field recording, sound effects and specialized sound design for TV / film, web media and video games.

What is your current studio set up?

My current studio setup is centered around two Mac computer workstations, Macbook Pro, and Microsoft Surface pro portable laptops. I have two stations one for editing and the other side of the studio is setup for mixing, which consists of a Yamaha DM2000VCM digital console. The mix down setup consist of a Dangerous music 2Bus LT, and Universal Audio Apollo 16, which is then final mixed through a  Avalon VT-747SP. I basically work mostly from my laptop these days so I usually start things there, then final mix at home through that setup :-) I have also been jumping back into using analog modular synthesizers lately making music, and sound design with them.

You’re renowned for owning many analog synthesizers, but in what situations are you more likely to turn to a software alternative?

I use software based synthesizers just as much as I do hardware. The ease and ability to control them in a computer is extremely important to my work. You can automate as much as you want, and also have as many instances as your CPU will allow giving you lots of incredible power at your finger tips. I actually use software synthesizers for almost all of my sound design work. As I have to be able to recall settings and presets very quickly with sessions from client to client. Most importantly I have a wide variety of options and different synthesis engines to choose from. Some of my favorite synthesizers are software based. I love sitting down at a coffee shop or the airport and making sounds on the go with headphones, its really easy to work on things.

When working on a track, what is your process?

It never starts out the same way, sometimes I start with a melody of some sort. Or sometimes it might be a rhythmic structure, or sequence pattern. Other times it might be a collection of field recordings or samples I have made that I organize into something. Other times, I have something in my head I want to try so I start patching or programming in the computer. Its always different depending on the mood I am in. Some tracks come together in a matter of hours, others take months to complete. I am sort of all over the place when it comes to this process. I like having the freedom to experiment and try different things out in the process. Sometimes happy accidents will happen along the way and drive you into a different space you hadn’t thought to go.

Devine 2

If you experience a creative block in the studio, do you have any particular rituals that get the inspiration flowing again?

For me its getting away from the project for a few hours, or a day. Sometimes when you are working on something for a very long time, and get creatively stuck it can be frustrating. In these situations I put down what I am doing and leave and go out for a walk or a hike. Or even go out for a drive to the store to get my ears away from the project. Just to give them a rest, then come back to the session with a fresh mind, that can re-think the solution or problem. Often times I might listen to music, to get me out of the headspace and into something else for a while. Doing this usually gives me ideas and allows me to think different about maybe what I am doing.

Mixing down can often be frustrating when starting out in production, what advice would you give for getting tracks sounding release ready?

Well for me growing up it was a much different world. I was buying a lot of cheap hardware units, and learning how to mix the hard way. I would get a cheap compressor then learn how to use it, make many mistakes along the way, then move on to the next piece of equipment. For me it was better to acquire one piece of the mixing chain then try to fully understand what it did before moving on to the next part of the puzzle. Now all of these things are available in software, and in many cases built right into the channel strips of many DAWs. So learning about these things is very easy now, and all you have to do is put the time in to learn them. I would suggests just taking each section and studying what EQs, compressors, limiters etc. do. Examine how they behave, on various different material to get a better understanding of what they do. This is what I did, and record as much as possible. I would record hundreds of short tracks testing things out in my car to see what things would do. Also now you have access to the internet, there are hundreds of videos and articles that talk about this subject at great lengths. I also would join the GearSlutz forum as there is lots of great information about mixing and various techniques.  I don’t claim to be an expert on this, but feel that would be a great starting point.

What’s up next for you, any releases in the pipeline?

I have a new album in the works, which is all modular based that will be coming out later next year. It will be a collection of modular tracks that will be fully documented. Each track will be recorded into a video with detailed patch notes, so they can watch the track being created live, and also study what modules and techniques were used.

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Studio Focus: Cardopusher / Hugh on May 19th

Cardopusher

For our readers who are not familiar with you yet, can you tell us a bit about what you do?

I’ve been making music in the electronic spectrum as Cardopusher for the last 15 years. I’ve been involved in several different genres / scenes but for quite some time now I’ve been mostly making house and techno. In 2011 I started a little record label called Classicworks, which I co-run with my friend Nehuen, and we have released underground stuff ranging from techno, house, noise, power electronics, early rave and more. I’m not interested in being pigeonholed in just one genre, its so boring to me. You can find my recent stuff on labels like I Love Acid, Super Rhythm Trax, Them UK… And obviously on my own label Classicworks.

Can you tell us a bit about your studio set up?

In my set up Ableton Live runs as the master, and is hooked up via midi with a TR-707, TR-505, x0xb0x, Electribe ESX-1, Vermona Mono Lancet, Oberheim Matrix1000 and few pedals. Im also using an Elektron Octatrack for sample mangling stuff, and to record some loops on the computer to process later. I like the balance between analog and digital so i use whatever is handy to me.

When working on a track, what is your process?

I normally work on drums first, I have an extensive drum machine sample library so i go deep in looking for the right sound of every drum kit. Then I start to mess with the synths, basslines and samples in general. At this stage I start to record a few bits, ideas, mistakes, loops - and when I get enough material the next step is normally to arrange, followed by editing and mixing.

How do you normally go about sourcing and designing sounds for your music?

I look for new sounds constantly because I work a lot with samplers, so I spend time filling the Octatrack or Electribe with new sources to work on, otherwise I get bored of the same sounds. I grab sounds from everywhere, it could be from vinyl, high quality recorded sounds or simply just lo fi YouTube stuff.

If you experience a creative block in the studio, do you have any particular rituals that get the inspiration flowing again?

When I get a creative block what works best for me is to leave the studio for a while, so my ritual to get the inspiration flowing again is normally hanging with friends, going record shopping, watching movies, basically I just need to get some fresh air. When I’m back again I put on some music to get in the mood while I’m preparing the machines to start work on. Discovering new music makes me want to go to the studio immediately.

Mixing down can often be frustrating when starting out in production, what advice would you give to getting tracks ready for the club?

Definitely you need to have patience, the only way for getting tracks ready for the club is spending lot of time making music and learning all about the audio processing realm. It’s also very important to listen to different genres to understand how production works in different areas.

What’s up next for you, any releases in the pipeline?

Next up I have a 12″ record coming out on Zodiac44 which is based in Berlin, on May 19th. Then I have a track coming on a Classicworks tape compilation in the next months, followed by a 7″ split on the label from me and Nehuen later in the year. Other than that I have been spending a lot of time in the studio finishing new tracks, so there is definitely more stuff coming for sure.

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Circle², EyeGaze instruments & the South-West Open Youth Orchestra / Hugh on May 9th

Bradley Rehearsals

#SWOYO musician Bradley in rehearsal - Photo by Paul Blakemore

Circle² has become a key ingredient in the design of bespoke accessible instruments for the UK’s first disabled-led regional youth orchestra - the South-West Open Youth Orchestra #SWOYO. This includes instruments built around infra-red motion-sensing cameras that can track the movements of your head or your eyes, to enable precise and expressive control over musical notes.

OpenUp Music is the pioneering charity behind #SWOYO - we empower young disabled musicians to build inclusive youth orchestras. But if you’re imagining an old-fashioned orchestra with ranks of strings, woodwind and brass playing the same old repertoire in the same old way, think again. We believe that young disabled musicians can radically redefine the idea of The Orchestra, tackling inequality, inspiring new musical instruments and creating new musical forms for the 21st century.

#SWOYO is about mixing up talented disabled and non-disabled musicians, and colliding cutting-edge music technology with conventional instruments. It’s also about pushing music technology much harder to realise accessible, expressive and virtuosic musical instruments that are playable to a high-level in real time, (as opposed to being sequenced, quantised, auto-tuned or pre-recorded – not that there’s anything wrong with that, it’s just not what we do.)

Bradley + George

#SWOYO musicians Bradley and George - Photo by Paul Blakemore

Bradley & George are two #SWOYO musicians for whom Circle² forms the bedrock of their sound. They both have Cerebral Palsy, which for them makes physical control of conventional instruments or computer hardware (mouse, trackpad, keyboard…) challenging. They’re both talented, passionate young musicians and through a process of ‘participatory design’ we co-created bespoke music software environments that George plays with precise head movements using a SmartNav motion-sensor, and that Bradley plays with his eyes using his Tobii EyeGaze.

In rehearsal and performance, the #SWOYO set-up is built around Ableton Live and a 12-speaker-array of Genelec monitors, to ensure that each musician’s sound is location-specific as it would be in a conventional acoustic orchestra. But for any musician to perform to a high standard, they also need to play and practice regularly at home. So, in addition to accessibility and expressivity, another key consideration in designing George & Bradley’s instruments was that they needed to be simple enough to plug in and play at home, without the need for an ‘Ableton-geek’ on hand to set up and trouble-shoot.

After testing and considering a range of options, Circle² was a clear choice. Not only does it sound great, (to my ears Circle² has a rounded sound with the potential for softness or bite in equal measure without ever being harsh,) but also it runs well both as a plug-in within Ableton, and stand-alone for playing at home. I also find Circle² to be really intuitive and quick for designing sounds. I work fast and need to be focused on the musical outcomes, not tangled up in endless tech-twiddling.

Bristol Cathedral Performance

#SWOYO’s first performance, at Bristol Cathedral - Photo by Paul Blakemore

The first #SWOYO concert took place at Bristol Cathedral on 16th April 2016. We performed Liz Lane’s ‘Silver Rose’ with the Lydbrook Brass Band, the UWE Singers and Alison Howell (organ), conducted by Ian Holmes. It was an amazing event with synth, brass, choir, piano and organ combining to dramatic effect in the cavernous and reverberant acoustic of the cathedral.

Coming up - #SWOYO will be performing as part of BBC Music Day on 3rd June at Bristol’s Colston Hall, to be broadcast on BBC Radio 3 In Tune. And The One Show recently made a short programme about #SWOYO - follow @openupmusic on Twitter for news of the broadcast date when it’s announced.

Finally, we’re still recruiting for the South-West Open Youth Orchestra! If you, or anyone you know is interested in joining, check out the requirements and get in touch via the #SWOYO webpage

Doug Bott – Musical Director, OpenUp Music
5th May 2016

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Circle² Future Sounds: UK Dubstep / Hugh on April 25th

* All non percussive elements in this track were generated using Circle² Future Sounds: Dubstep Vol.1

Circle² Future Sounds is our new series in which we explore the sounds behind genres from around the globe. In our first instalment, we take a look at the origins of Dubstep in the UK. Dubstep is a genre that primarily grew out out of the dark underground of the ever more commercially leaning UK garage scene in the mid 2000s. It also drew heavily on the lineage of drum and bass, jungle, dub and reggae. Now sometimes associated with harsh mid range and stadium performances, dubstep originally began as a deep and contemplative musical style.

We have developed a bank of sounds inspired by these earlier origins of dubstep’s evolution. Alongside the presets we have also included a demo track, with the associated project file, audio stems and midi files we used in its creation, so you can pick apart the elements and understand the production techniques synonymous with UK Dubstep!

Download the pack below, it contains all the elements you need to make a deep, dark dubstep banger.

Circle² Future Sounds: UK Dubstep

1. Asia Pluck
2. Dynamic Tension Atmos
3. Shaped White Lead
4. Swollen Bass
5. Wobbling Bass
6. Wobbling Bass 2

Download the expansion

Download the project files

To install the presets, just unzip and paste the folder “Future Sounds - UK Dubstep″ in here:

OSX - Application Support > FAW > Circle-2 > Presets
Windows - Program Files > FAW > Circle2 > Presets

Studio Focus: Milkplant / Hugh on April 4th

Milkplant

For our readers who are not familiar with you yet, can you tell us a bit about what you do?

I produce and DJ Techno under the Milkplant alias and, co-own and operate From 0-1, the US West Coast based Techno label, and jointly curate the From 0-1 Studio Sessions podcast.

Can you tell us a bit about your studio set up?

I generally use a pretty balanced combination of hardware and software. Some items on the hardware side:  Arp Odyssey, Roland TR8, SH-101, SH-201, DSI Mono Evolver, Korg Volca Sampler, Arturia Beatstep, Yamaha RX-15, Moog MF-101, MXR Carbon Copy, Avalon vt-737, Summit 2BA-221, Allen & Heath System 8. On the software side, some notable plug-ins: Ableton Live, Waves SSL 4000, Chandler Limited TG12413 Limiter, Slate VCC, Madrona Labs Aalto, Arturia Moog Modular V, CS-80V, Minimoog, Spark Drum Machine; Soundtoys Echoboy & Filterfreak, and FAW Circle 2.

When working on a track, what is your process?

I start by first nailing down a solid loop - kick and bass usually come first. I mix iteratively, that is, as I go. I apply EQ and compression on those parts right away so I have a solid base to start from. My kicks are always heavily layered, anywhere from three to five kicks layered at a time. I will often have a boomy kick, thumpy kick, snappy kick, and distorted kick bussed to the same channel. For my bass, I will often cut up loops of a bassline from my Odyssey, SH-101, or Minimoog V and layer a couple parts to create interesting rhythmic combinations. I create my main synth leads by jamming out on a pattern and layer iterations of the same pattern with slightly different varying modulation to create a more full and interesting arrangement. Overdubs of hihats, and other percussion kind of occur as I go. From there I create edits in my arrangement around transitions, and layer in some spacializing effects, while side chained reverbs or ambient noise to create a subtle pumping element. After applying fine tuned mix tweaks, I test the track on as many sound sources as I possibly can, and I also work it into a DJ set during a practice session to see if from a DJ perspective it makes sense. That’s it in a nutshell.

How do you normally go about sourcing and designing sounds for your music?

I’m predominantly a synth/drum machine guy. I don’t really use samples or sample packs. Not that I have anything against them, it’s just not a part of my work flow right now; I prefer generating my own sound sources. I create patches from scratch, and I do use presets sometimes as a starting point, but by the time I’m done with modulations and modifications a synth sound will never sound like the originally patch. I usually effect my synths and drum patches quite a bit, and layer heavily as I previously pointed out. To me, the kind of Techno I produce would be impossible to make were it not for a lot of layering and effecting.

If you experience a creative block in the studio, do you have any particular rituals that get the inspiration flowing again?

When that happens, sometimes I just feel like it’s time to take a break and step away from the studio. But if I’m determined to get past it, which I usually am, I find that practicing DJing really helps to reset my brain. Hearing a lot of tracks in succession that aren’t my own gives me ideas and usually is good at clearing a block for me. I also find that going out to a show to see a DJ or producer I like helps to inspire me. But if I’m not feeling like doing anything music related I will spend some time in my garden or do some cooking, or get out into nature and take a hike- good activities I engage in on the regular to keep myself well rounded and inspired in general.

Mixing down can often be frustrating when starting out in production, what advice would you give to getting tracks ready for the club?

The mixdown process is generally the most technical aspect of production. I would encourage anyone trying to produce to have a firm understanding of mixing from a technical standpoint. There are countless blogs out there now that can assist, but I recommend picking up a manual and getting as deep as you can into the details. Mixing Audio by Roey Izhaki, and Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio by Mike Senior are two books that have served me well over the years. But if you’ve got the fundamentals already figured out, then I recommend testing your mixed track on as many sound sources as possible, DJ it with other tracks, and if you’re fortunate enough, play it out in a club environment to see how it sounds. Also, use a reference track from another producer that you really like as you mix down your track to compare and contrast. And lastly, use a variety of mixing tools, don’t only rely on stock plug-ins in Ableton Live. There’s a myriad of production tools out there worth exploring to help you find your own unique sound.

What’s up next for you, any releases in the pipeline?

I have several EPs coming up, dates aren’t set yet. Unfortunately it’s premature of me to make public any additional info. My Milkplant artist page on Facebook will be updated as dates draw closer.

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South-West Open Youth Orchestra to use Circle² in their inaugural Bristol Cathedral performance / Hugh on March 29th

The South-West Open Youth Orchestra is the UK’s only disabled-led regional youth orchestra. When they reached out requesting help in setting-up some of their musicians with Circle² we jumped at the chance to get involved. Specifically, the orchestra will perform a piece during which they will play Circle² via eye tracking technology!

The orchestra will be using Circle² as part of their Bristol Cathedral concert on 16th April 2016, which will also be featured on The One Show (BBC 1). We will be updating the weblog with photos and a more detailed account of how Circle² fitted in to the performance later this month.

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Studio Focus: South London Ordnance / Hugh on March 24th

SLO

For our readers who are not familiar with you yet, can you tell us a bit about what you do?

I produce various strains of Techno, some of it’s melodic - other stuff a bit harder, most of it’s quite atmospheric. I run my own label called Aery Metals & I’m currently based in Berlin.

Can you tell us a bit about your studio set up?

I always feel a bit awkward talking about my set up, especially as we’re in the midst of such a hardware renaissance - but I just use an iMac with Logic 9, a UA Apollo Twin soundcard and a small Korg Midi Keyboard. I have a couple of guitars which I can plug into the soundcard or record in my room via a few mics, all of which are a bit knackered but generally have some character of their own. Really, I rely on a lot of analogue modelled plugins - UA EQ’s, some of the Waves stuff, the PSP Vintage Warmer & a lot of the Plugin Alliance bits and pieces. Beyond that Fabfilter EQ’s & a few random free things I found wandering round the net that proved to be miles better than anything you can pay for.

When working on a track, what is your process?

I never just poke about, hoping something will write itself. I sit down with quite a clear idea of what I’m making in my head. Generally, I’ll think about my own sets and when I’d like to play what I’m hoping to make - or whether it’s even something dancefloor, and if it isn’t what kind of energy am I looking for? Once i’ve made that decision - usually over a coffee or in the shower early in the morning, I sit down and try and write it. More and more I return to the same tools, and as a result I’ve got much better at using them. I prefer this method to constantly sourcing new gear - for me, especially this year - it’s become much more about hooks & “tunes” - recognisable licks, so really - it’s not about what you write it on - but rather what you actually write. Just because you’ve used an extremely rare synth, doesn’t automatically elevate this rather dull riff you’ve got going on to something more than it is. It’s still shit.

How do you normally go about sourcing and designing sounds for your music?

Generally, a single track or mix will lead me on to a particular sound - particular drum hits, ways of using reverb or delays - and I’ll spend a few months listening to records from that period / genre whatever, and think about how I can work these things into my own music. I found recently I like Linn kicks, so I found a mate with a Linn drum & recorded some kicks. But they were really dry and not quite right, I messed around with them for a while - made a few tracks where the samples sat badly in the mix etc, but then one time - I put them through a particular chain and they sounded how I wanted them to. So I just recorded the sample - and that kick has been my kick for a while. With synth sounds - I don’t use any presets or anything, they never save on my copy of Logic anyway. I only use one synth at the moment, the Arturia Modular and I just start from scratch each time - but each time I get a bit better and making the sound I want, so it becomes easier & quicker and more satisfying, or you work out how to finally do something you’ve wanted to for a while. It’s very much just trial & error - I know what the knobs do - but I suppose depending on ones mood you end up putting them this way or that each time & sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t. But as I said before - I go in with a plan. So if I want soft sounds, I go with a particular process, harsh sounds - the same etc.

If you experience a creative block in the studio, do you have any particular rituals that get the inspiration flowing again?

I walk round Templehof Feld on my own speaking to myself out loud. I live about 20 metres from the main entrance so I spend a lot of time in there. I think the speaking out loud to myself makes people think I’m nuts, but it’s extremely cathartic & as a result no one ever starts a conversation with you which suits me perfectly. Otherwise, I just listen to music or read, or research art I like. It’s very simple in my opinion, the more you know - the better your art. Of course, naïveté can bring forth happy accidents - moments of total genius even, but I genuinely think they’re short lived. If you make a point to consume art that excites you, I really feel like you’ll always be finding inspiration - whatever the format, and it feeds into the music.

Mixing down can often be frustrating when starting out in production, what advice would you give to getting tracks ready for the club?

Yeah, I’ve only recently got the hang of this. When I first started out, I thought you just needed lots of bass - because that’s what I liked in a club. But it’s not true - and actually it’s the top end that really drives people nuts. It’s actually fascinating amending mixdowns between gigs and seeing how people react differently when you change the focal point of the track - i.e. it was this subby kick drum, with subdued highs - and then you pulled in the kick and gave the highs a bit more clarity. In the former instance - people were very heads down, in the latter - much more energetic. So yeah, take out bass! Loads more than you think you should - aim for balance. I was reading about a cartoonist recently - I can’t remember his or her name, but they said they could only really draw these distorted figures once they’d learnt how to draw from life, figuratively. And I think there’s a lot to be said there about mixing. Learn to create balanced, clear mixes - and then when you’ve got that, you can focus on pulling out the bits that are you, give them you’re own character - really mould them into something that’s your own. That’s really just my opinion, but it’s something that’s worked a lot for me recently. And mids - avoid too many mids, but don’t get rid of them completely… Just avoid the noise, round 250 - 350Hz (somewhere round there), it always muffles the mix in my experience. I use about 6 Fabfilter EQ’s on every chanel, each with a dip here or there on it - it’s incredibly CPU intensive & probably completely wrong, but it allows me to really carve into the sounds. On the master I’ve got a 30Hz hi pass filter, and then after a few other plugs - another Fabfilter for final tweaks. But it’s all about balance - thinking about the sonic spectrum and how to fill it, making sure things that are not contributing to one frequency band are not filling it - hi hats should have no low end etc. Unless of course that’s what you want - in which case return to the earlier point about making stuff your own.

Or alternatively, just pay someone to do it like so many people seem to be doing these days.

What’s up next for you, any releases in the pipeline?

Yeah loads. Just finished a bunch of records for my own label so just focusing on getting those out this year.

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